Posts Tagged ‘politics’

John Tedesco explains government cookies and politicians on Twitter

September 28, 2009

Jason Davis asked Dr. John Tedesco a couple of burning questions about government social media. Here’s how he answered:

Getting to Know Dr. John Tedesco

September 11, 2009

One of the academics joining us at Connect this year is Dr. John Tedesco from Virginia Tech, paired with Lt. Connie Braesch of the U.S. Coast Guard, discussing social media in the government. Tedesco is an Associate Professor and Director of Research and Outreach in the Department of Communication at Virginia Tech.

He attributes his doctorate from the University of Oklahoma as his most important accomplishment allowing him to do the work he loves including teaching public relations and political communication courses as well as his research into politics, media, and young people.

Tedesco identified the following as facts you won’t find in his biography:

1) I am one of three American political communication researchers invited to join the 2009 German National Election Research Team led by Michaela Maier at the University of Koblenz-Landau.
2) I co-edited a special issue of American Behavioral Scientist devoted to media, politics, and young voters.
3) I am a two-time recipient of the University of Oklahoma’s President Award for Teaching Excellence given to four faculty members each year.

When asked about the first Web site he visited every day, besides e-mail, Tedesco stated “It varies.  During the past couple weeks, the first site I visited was the US Open site to get updates on the latest tennis matches.  I’m a huge tennis fan.  You can also find me on Facebook and Twitter.”

Additionally, he identified RSS feeds as being the biggest new media influence because he does not need to visit all of the different sites he’s interested in and “before RSS, surveillance and tracking were very difficult to accomplish.”

His advice to PR educators and professionals is “do your research, especially if working on campaigns.  Don’t assume your experience with an audience or a market is sufficient as audiences and markets shift regularly.”

For more information on Dr. John Tedesco, please see his Virginia Tech profile and follow him on Twitter @jctedesco